The Physical Environment Reinforces Who…

Katherine Morris, M.A.,Ph.D., is an Environmental Psychologist
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The Physical Environment Reinforces Who We Are   In mythology, film, literature, and daily living, setting is important: Zeus…

The Physical Environment Reinforces Who We Are   In mythology, film, literature, and daily living, setting is important: Zeus on Mt.Olympus, Poseidon in the sea, Hades in the underworld, Artemis in the forest, and Hestia at the hearth inside the temple. In film, as in literature and in daily life, the words "don't move," when uttered in a doctors' office versus in a jungle, or…

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Light Therapy & Health

Dr. Robert Hedaya
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Your Biologic Clock   Your Biologic Clock keeps our body rhythms and sleep –wake cycles in synch with the…

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Highest Rates of Bipolar Disorder in the United States: Why?

Dr. Robert Hedaya
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According to a new study discussed on Health.com “about 2.4% of people around the world have had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder at some point in their lifetime, according to the first comprehensive international figures on the topic. The United States has the highest lifetime rate of bipolar disorder at 4.4%, and India the lowest, with 0.1%”.   Bipolar disorder has a…

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Mood, Gut Bacteria, and the Immune System

Dr. Robert Hedaya
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Many people would be surprised that the immune system, the gastro-intestinal tract and stress interact, but that is what the most recent of a number of studies shows. In this study on mice, (Brain, Behavior, and Immunity Volume 25, Issue 3, March 2011, Pages 397-407. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21040780) researchers demonstrated that psychological stress causes almost immediate changes to the gut bacterial population,…

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Lyme Disease

Dr. Robert Hedaya
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Lyme disease is the result of infection with the spirochete Borrelia Burgdorferi. It is generally thought that the infection is the result of a tick bite, which about 50% of the time results in a rash, often described as a ‘bulls eye’ rash, but which can vary in appearance.   Symptoms of untreated Lyme disease typically include joint aches which…

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Can a Brain Be on Fire?

Dr. Robert Hedaya
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Yes! Over the last 20 years, ample evidence has accumulated to prove that inflammation in the body causes changes in the brain that lead to depression, anxiety, sleep problems, and memory problems. Inflammation comes from the Latin ‘inflammare’ — to set on fire. Our brain is ‘on fire’ when it is inflamed, or when our body is inflamed.    …

Yes! Over the last 20 years, ample evidence has accumulated to prove that inflammation in the body causes changes in the brain that lead to depression, anxiety, sleep problems, and memory problems. Inflammation comes from the Latin ‘inflammare’ — to set on fire. Our brain is ‘on fire’ when it is inflamed, or when our body is inflamed.     What sets your brain on fire? Your body experiences inflammation the way your skin reacts to a cut: The area becomes swollen, warmer, and it may hurt. (This happens because there is increased blood flow, increased immune activity, and a change in the chemistry in the area.) When there is inflammation any where in the body, signals are sent to the brain via various cytokines. The cytokines send signals to the brain via the vagus nerve and other pathways. These cytokine signals then block the brain from making serotonin.     What does the fire do to your brain? Inflammation affects hormones and other neurotransmitters in your brain. Inflammation drives down the level of serotonin, which can lead to feelings of depression or anxiety, and problems with memory. It prevents…

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